Trying New Things Can Be Equal Parts Spooky and Fun!

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Mama Witch is busy making a special treat for her Picky Little Witch. A witch’s brew filled with all kinds of awful ingredients, from eye of newt to hair of slug. The list goes on and on across several pages, each more disgusting than the last. The Picky Little Witch mimics the reader’s own thoughts, yuck, gross and even barf! She comes up with many different excuses why she can’t try the witch’s stew, but Mama Witch has a clever solution for each one. Eventually, the Picky Little Witch tries the stew and to her and our surprise, she actually loves it!

 

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Then it’s time for trick-or-treating! Mama Witch watches the Picky Little Witch collect all kinds of goodies. From candy apples to licorice snakes. As the Picky Little Witch’s excitement mounts so does Mama Witch’s disgust. The Picky Little Witch encourages her mom to try some of these delectable Halloween treats, and she refuses, much like her daughter earlier in the story.  She offers up many excuses, but her daughter refutes each one. Talk about role reversals. Mama Witch ends up loving the sweet treats as much as the Picky Little Witch loved the witch’s brew. In the end, they learn that trying new things isn’t all scary.

The Picky Little Witch by Elizabeth Brokamp is great for kids ages 5-8.

 

Hallo-What?

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Marceline is a young witch who wonders why all the witches are collecting pumpkins one day. She goes to her grandmother’s house to find out what is going on and sees that her grandma also has a pumpkin. Overwhelmed and confused, she begins to cry. Her grandmother tenderly reassures her that everything is okay and explains that the witches are preparing for Halloween!

Hallo-What? is a great introductory book that explains what Halloween is, including the origin of the different Halloween customs. It is a sweet story that is perfectly not scary for young children. Once she understands what Halloween is, Marceline and her friends dress up and go trick-or-treating. (With adult supervision, of course!)

Hallo-What is great for kids ages 5-8.

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All About Halloween

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Halloween is… by Gail Gibbons is a wonderful all about Halloween book for young readers. This non-fiction book explores the origin of many common aspects of Halloween from trick-or-treating to jack-o-lanterns. Readers can learn about how different Halloween traditions have evolved over time.

The headings make it easy for a reader to navigate the text and identify the parts he/she wants to read. The illustrations support the text to promote understanding. I always tell young readers that the difference between fiction and non-fiction reading is that non-fiction informational texts do not necessarily have to be read from beginning to end.

Gail Gibbons is a phenomenal, prolific non-fiction writer for young readers. Halloween Is.. is just another staple in any 1st-3rd grade classroom library.

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Explaining Away the Spooky

Grace, the main character in Ella Bailey’s No Such Thing*, is a clever young girl who explains away anything that might be perceived as spooky. Without hesitation and with great confidence, she identifies the culprit when objects go missing or are moved around.

No Such Thing is the perfect book for young kids who enjoy uncovering mysteries. Not to mention the amazing vocabulary! From savy sleuth to  presumed, suspected and pilfered, this book is great for word work with young readers. Using context clues and sentence structure to help determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.

No Such Thing is a wonderful read for kids ages 3-7. The illustrations are colorful and engaging. Ella Bailey invites the reader to revisit the pages, jam packed with realistic details, to find the ghosts on each!

Click here to purchase a copy of No Such Thing (affiliate link).

*I received a complimentary copy of No Such Thing in exchange for my honest review.

 

 

Halloween is Coming!

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Peek-a-Boooo! Is an adorable lift the flap picture book that is perfect for getting kids into the Halloween spirit. This is a silly rather than scary read that is great for young children. Marie Torres Cimarusti’s text is simple and fun. Stephanie Peterson’s illustrations are large scale.  Kids will enjoy pulling each character’s hands away from his/her face to reveal a classic Halloween figure.

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What’s in the Witch’s Kitchen?  by Nick Sharratt is a clever take on a life the flap picture book. Take a closer look into the witch’s kitchen. Open the flap in one direction, find something ordinary and possibly delightful. Open the flap in the other direction to reveal something spooky and undesirable. This book is bound to leave young readers giggling.

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The Special Relationship Between Mom and Child

Bloom is a lovely picture book about a mother and daughter who plant tulip bulbs together one day. They take turns digging holes and planting the bulbs one by one while laughing along the way. Deborah Diesen, author of the Pout-Pout Fish series, captures the tactile experience of planting, from handling the dirt to carefully examining the bulbs. Each character wonders silently how bulbs could possibly bloom into something big and tall.

 Time passes. Celebrations. A big trip. So much happens that the mother and daughter both almost forget that they’d planted the bulbs. Mary Lundquist’s illustrations are beautiful and capture not only the emotional setting but the passing of time perfectly.

But, day by day they grow. As does the relationship and love between mother and daughter. Bloom is a wonderful ode to the special connection between mom and child. The love blossoms as do the tulips at the end of the story, slow yet strong. Bloom celebrates spending time together and making memories that will last a lifetime.

Click here to purchase a copy of Bloom (affiliate link).

*I received a complimentary copy of Bloom in exchange for my honest review.

 

 

Easter Board Books

Holiday themed picture books are so much fun. It’s our first round of holidays with our little one and I’m still trying to figure out how we will navigate holiday books as part of our own home library collection. Leave them out throughout the year or bring them out as each holiday nears? I’d love to hear how you handle this in your school or home collections!

Somehow spring snuck up on me this year. Maybe it’s the 10-month old and having just gone back to work full time, but Easter is right around the corner. My little one is loving these two board books right now!

In Happy Easter, Pout-Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen, join the pout-pout fish dressed up as a bunny and his underwater creature friends as they hide and find easter eggs in unexpected places. This is a fun, captivating read for babies and toddlers alike.

Peep and Egg: I’m Not Hatching by Laura Gehl is a hilarious book. Peep can’t wait for Egg to hatch so that they can begin their many fun adventures today. But Egg is not having it. He’s too scared to make an appearance. Nothing Peep says will convince him to hatch. Young readers will laugh along as Peep tries to coax Egg out of his shell. Will Egg finally take a chance and hatch? Joyce Wan’s illustrations are bold, colorful and add to the comedy of each page.   

Click here to purchase a copy of Happy Easter, Pout-Pout Fish and Peep and Egg: I’m Not Hatching (affiliate links).

 

 

Entertaining Easter Reads

   Here Comes the Easter Cat by Deborah Underwood is a hilarious Easter read. It accurately portrays the personality of many cats. Claudia Rueda’s illustrations add an extra layer of comedic value, making this book a must have for any cat-loving family.

Cat sees a poster announcing that the Easter Bunny is coming soon and it upsets him. The narrator tries to reason with Cat, explaining that the Easter Bunny’s job is a hard one and not just anyone can take his place, but Cat cannot help but feel jealous and angry. The narrator invites him to be the Easter Cat and bring nice things to children everywhere as well. See his response for yourself!

Yes, that’s a hairball!

As the story continues, Cat comes up with unconventional ways to one up the Easter Bunny every step of the way on his journey to becoming the Easter Cat. The ending to this adorable story is unexpected and thoughtful.

Here Comes the Easter Cat is a must-have if you are looking for a fun-filled Easter-themed picture book. Click here to purchase a copy of this book (affiliate link).

Another fantastic Easter picture book is Chester’s Colorful Easter Eggs by Theresa Smythe. Chester the bunny is eager to decorate Easter eggs and hide them for his friends. He carefully dyes and designs each egg a special color and finds the perfect hiding spot. This book is perfect for young readers learning colors to reinforce names. It’s also great for looking at the bright and bold illustrations and naming familiar objects and creatures.

Chester’s Colorful Easter Eggs is a simple yet fantastic book about friendship and making meaningful memories.

Click here to purchase a copy of Chester’s Colorful Easter Eggs (affiliate link).

 

A Hilarious St. Patrick’s Day Read

How to Catch a Leprechaun by Adam Wallace is a hysterical St. Patrick’s Day read. St. Patrick’s Day is near and the Leprechaun is ready to cause maximum trouble, from dumping glitter in your hair to turning your toilet green!

The Leprechaun visits many different homes causing lots of mischief, and escaping booby traps them left and right. He’s quick. He’s crafty. He’s merciless.

How to Catch a Leprechaun is a fun read for kids of all ages. The illustrations by Andy Elkerton highlight the mess the Leprechaun leaves behind as well as the intricacies of the plans to finally trap him.

How to Catch a Leprechaun is great for readers ages 3-7. Click here to purchase a copy of this book (affiliate link).

 

 

The Perfect St. Patrick’s Day Story

The holiday section of our local library may be my favorite. It is organized chronologically and features so many fantastic books for the different holidays throughout the year.

A Fine St. Patrick’s Day by Susan Wojciechowski is a fantastic story about community and being kind to others. It’s nearly St. Patrick’s Day and two rival towns, Tralah and Tralee, are preparing for their annual decorating contest. Tralah wins each year. This year, Tralee comes up with the perfect idea.

Both towns are hard at work, when a little man arrives seeking help. His cows are stuck in the mud. The residents of Tralah are too busy cutting out and glittering shamrocks to help. He crosses into Tralee and though they are reluctant at first, the townspeople come together and do the right thing.

A Fine St. Patrick’s Day is a simple story with an important message. The illustrations by Tom Curry have a folk art element, the characters have exaggerated features and the colors are earthy and natural. This is the perfect St. Patrick’s Day read.

Click here to purchase a copy of A Fine St. Patrick’s Day (affiliate link).